Published!

Children and Society front coverWe are thrilled to say that an article we have co-written as a research team has been accepted for publication in the leading journal, Children and Society. The article, entitled “I was excited by the idea of a project that focuses on those unasked questions” Co-Producing Disability Research with Disabled Young People, details the politics and practicalities of co-produced disability research with disabled young people with life-limiting and life-threatening impairments.

The article highlights the absences of disabled children and young people from ‘child-led inquiry’ – research that positions children and young people as potential leaders of research and who have ‘an alternative, legitimate expertise to that of academic researchers’ (Nind et al. 2012: 660).

Some proponents of child-led inquiry argue that, inevitably, some aspect of the research process are better managed by adults (see Nind 2008); for example the writing up and publishing of research findings (Bailey et al. 2014; Nind et al. 2007). As Abell et al. (2007) state, it is academics that have the access to computer technologies, experience of academic writing, and knowledge of peer review and publication. However, we are explicit that our article has been co-authored with Living Life to the Fullest young co-researchers, and we purposefully detail these methods of co-authorship (see Walmsley, 2004). Thus, our focus in our article is not to debate whether disabled young people should be included in research, but to show how (see Tuffrey-Wijne, Bernal & Hollins, 2008): what we have learned from our experiences in Living Life to the Fullest so far and how these can helpfully inform other researchers.

We share our abstract below; the article will be out in due course, and will be open access, meaning it can be accessed by all.

Liddiard, K., Runswick-Cole, K, Goodley, D., Whitney, S., Vogelmann, E. and Watts, L. (accepted) ‘”I was excited by the idea of a project that focuses on those unasked questions”: Co-Producing Disability Research with Disabled Young People’, Children and Society.

“I was excited by the idea of a project that focuses on those unasked questions” Co-Producing Disability Research with Disabled Young People

 In this article we detail the politics and practicalities of co-produced disability research with disabled young people with life-limiting and life-threatening impairments. We centre an ESRC-funded arts-informed co-produced research project that has brought together a Co-Researcher Collective of disabled young people. Co-production is an established approach; however, our co-researchers have led us to develop inclusive research practices that engage with online social research methods in innovative ways. As we detail our experiences, we aim to encourage disability studies researchers and others to adopt virtual environments when researching with and for the lives of disabled people.

Keywords: co-production; life-limiting, youth, online, virtual

References

Abell, S. et al. (2007) Including everyone in research: The Burton Street Group, British, Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35, 121-24.

Bailey, S., Boddy, K., Briscoe, S. and Morris, C. (2014) ‘Involving disabled children and young people as partners in research: a systematic review’, Child: care, health and development, 41, 4, 505–514

Nind, M. (2008) ‘Conducting qualitative research with people with learning, communication and other disabilities: Methodological challenges’, ESRC National Centre for Research Methods Review Paper, National Centre for Research Methods

Nind, M., Flewitt, R. & Payler, J. (2007) The experiences of young children with learning disabilities attending both special and inclusive preschools, Report for Rix, Thompson, Rothenberg Foundation, University of Southampton.

Nind, M. Wiles, R., Bengry-Howell, A. and Crow, G. (2012) Methodological innovation and research ethics: forces in tension or forces in harmony? Qualitative Research, 13: 6, 650–667

Tuffrey-Wijne, I., Bernal, J. & Hollins, S. (2008) ‘Doing research on people with learning disabilities, cancer and dying: ethics, possibilities and pitfalls’, British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 36: 3, 185-90.

Walmsley, J. (2004) Inclusive learning disability research: the (nondisabled) researcher’s role, British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 32, 65-71.

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